Film Review: THE ACID SORCERER (2017)

Dakota Bailey is one of the newer names in indie/underground horror. His movies are small, but getting bigger. I have reviewed American Scumbags in the past. That was definitely a film that showed promise, despite the occasional rookie mistakes. The Acid Sorcerer is a huge step up. This definitely makes me happy to say that I may have been right when I said he showed promise in the past.

Once again following around some of the worst human beings in society, The Acid Sorcerer paints a disturbing picture of human desperation. While I was only slightly disturbed by his characters in the past, I was definitely more deeply effected this time around. I think this is because he is beginning to portray them in a more efficient light. There is just a very strange aesthetic that I get from them this time around, that is difficult to describe. They are basically the same dirty and raunchy characters; only this time, there is something subtly different about them. The more I think back through the film, the more I think it has more to do with the actors and the editing. The performances, for instance, seemed more unnervingly maniacal. They delivered their lines in such nonchalant tones that it downplayed the seriousness of what they were saying. It made you truly believe that they thought there was nothing wrong with the twisted plans that they had for their lives. There was a cold and calculated feel to these characters that was much more effective than some of the more over-the-top performances of past films.

As far as editing and cinematography go, this film has also shown great improvement. Like I mentioned before, there was no wasted time on characterization. The editing also moved the film along at a great pace. Many of the slow scenes and incoherent footage from the previous film were non-existent in this one, as the narrative flowed much more smoothly. This film was also shot in with a really nice black and white style. The settings were well chosen and there were many establishing shots that captured urban decay in an artistic and professional manner.The film quality was better. The sound was better. The whole movie was just better. If you have seen his stuff before, you should get this. If you have not seen any of his stuff, you should start here.

 

Author: Steven Paul

Born and raised in Michigan, slowly dying in Florida. I’m here to keep you informed about everything in the world of indie horror. I also specialize in all genres of exploitation, cult, and extreme cinema. As part owner and Editor of Film and Television for Beneath the Underground, it is my responsibility to provide vast amounts of information for the horror fan and an outlet for the filmmaker.

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