Film Review: Kuso (2017)

I recently heard about this film in a Facebook group. It is a really strange apocalyptic peek into urban living, sex, the music industry, and fame. It is a film that will definitely leave a mark on your memory, whether you decide that you like it or not.

The writer and director of this film is the quirky and eccentric musician that goes by the name Flying Lotus. He is apparently fairly well known in the music world. His music and lyrics have a dark tinge of nihilism and a borderline obsession with death. He even like to mess around with creepy visual art and animation, that may remind readers of this site of the work of Jimmy Screamerclauz.

As I approached this film, I was intrigued by the reaction that it had received at Sundance. I was also interested in the mixed reviews it was getting online. So when I found out I could get a free Shudder trial to check it out, I was all-in. Despite the fact that I had never heard of the filmmaker, there were names attached that I had recognized. George Clinton and Hannibal Burress were two that really stood out

The film opens with something that will not surprise those familiar with the work of Flying Lotus, catchy music and strange imagery. Before I knew it, I was completely entranced by the strangeness of the film. I really enjoyed the music, and found myself looking up more of his stuff on my phone while I was watching the movie. I thought the gore effects were decent, despite the fact that they were really downright repetitive gags full of facial sores and bodily fluids. The animated sequences were a nice touch, even though they did feel like long music videos at times. This balance had to occur for many aspects of the film. It seemed like I would like something, and then they would repeat it until I found it annoying. Even the gore that people have raved about takes a comedic turn that just becomes a really long piece of gross out humor.

So you see, I really had to take the good with the bad on this one. It did some great things for people into surreal cinema like Eraserhead and The Holy Mountain. The people who are already fans of his music, will at least enjoy the soundtrack. As far as underground gore fans go, I don’t know if it’s going to be quite as disgusting and disturbing as you may have heard. It’s definitely got production value that these fans may have to see; because, it’s kind of amazing that a film with this content has made it so close to what we would consider mainstream. So while I would definitely suggest a streaming view before adding it to the collection, I can say that it definitely has the potential to become a part of my collection when I can find it for less than ten bucks.

 

Author: Steven Paul

Born and raised in Michigan, slowly dying in Florida. I’m here to keep you informed about everything in the world of indie horror. I also specialize in all genres of exploitation, cult, and extreme cinema. As part owner and Editor of Film and Television for Beneath the Underground, it is my responsibility to provide vast amounts of information for the horror fan and an outlet for the filmmaker.

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