Film Review: THE COLOR OF POMEGRANATES (1969)

Film Review: THE COLOR OF POMEGRANATES (1969)

Jun 26, 2018

The Color of Pomegranates is a newer release from The Criterion Collection, directed by Sergei Parajanov. It is an interesting biography of the poet Sayat Nova told through numerous interconnected scenes of metaphoric and poetic imagery. For a film that came out in 1969, it is hard to separate from the more current autobiographical works of Alejandro Jodorowsky.

This movie has amazing costumes, set design, and direction. It is a worldwide masterpiece that many American viewers wouldn’t know about if it wasn’t for Criterion. Although they are expensive releases, I will blind buy the horror, surreal, and arthouse titles that they put out. This one bridges the gap between other Eastern European films like Sweet Movie and the cult film style of American surrealists like David Lynch. The visual style of this film is very memorable, and the obscure structure will keep you thinking long after you’ve seen it. If you are a fan of big films with sweeping set pieces like Barry Lyndon or L’Avventura you will like this one too.

Although it doesn’t have the extensive list of features that may Criterions possess, it was still one I had to pick up. Since Criterion will probably never get to release the films of Jodorowsky, this may be one of the best ways to see this type of film. So don’t worry about the features.

This is very fairly priced on Amazon. Many Criterion collectors pre-ordered it, but the occasional buyer of this label will want to get it too. So get ready for that half off sale at Barnes and Nobel in July.